godotstopdot:

ktabeau:

Am I doing this right

Get this on tumblr radar

(via not-acop)

"I understand you're paranoid. You think enemies are everywhere. I am so into that."

Deadpool Annual #2

(Source: psycho-escape, via peacelovefairytales)

unabletofindname:

teacherbach:

sociallychallengednerd:

why do people say chicken as a term for coward? Have you ever meet a chicken? Cause those things will fuck you up man

image

image

(via hairy-potato)

t0getic:

 

mim-akh:

forties-fifties-sixties-love:

1969

the only thing that’s changed since then is the quality of photos

(via not-acop)

jojogurlllx3:

Utilizing the critical thinking skills and greater levels of maturity assumed by my college degree, I deduced that I could make butt pancakes.

image

image

buttcakes

(Source: james-because-i-dont-know, via sei-tan48)

(Source: productionig, via dirtygrandma)

kitkatinc:

spelling bee administrator: your word is delicious
me: D to the E to the L I C I O U S to the D to the E to the to the to the
spelling bee administrator: hit it fergie

(via ivallinen)

miss-nerdgasmz:

the-meta:

cedpipe:

Remember when someone pulled a Madeon for K-pop songs

TAK - K-Pop Culture (Mashup)

(so has Monty seen this yet?)

SIGNAL BOOST UNTIL HE DOES

(via andreabutts)

kaajoo:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places

Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.

Source: Fast Co-Design

(via sonicchi)

mangaluva:

Sometimes I can’t stop thinking about how Zuko accidentally spoke against his father and begged for forgiveness, on his knees with tears in his eyes, and got half his face burned off and banished from his home

Then Zuko betrayed his uncle and everything Iroh had ever taught him, begged for forgiveness on his knees with tears in his eyes, and got a hug and complete forgiveness and unconditional love

(via thebestkickassasian)

jedavu:

Striking Posters Of Famous Gunslingers And Their Iconic Pistols

London-based designer Luke Butland has created a series of prints for the Hero Complex Gallery’s show titled ‘I am the law’. 

Butland’s series of illustration feature famous gunslingers in pop-culture and their iconic weapons, coinciding perfectly with the gallery’s theme. Han Solo from Star Wars and RoboCop are included in this collection. 

"

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

"

One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’.  (via romteen)

THANK YOU.

(via freshrosemary)

(via thebestkickassasian)